Bring It On Home To Me



1. OFFF Barcelona 2011 Main Titles

Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic. Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!! Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people. Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic: “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.” DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema) This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place. This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations. So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero. There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie. Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival. To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare. We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; ) How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot. When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us). In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer. The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles. The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project. Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this. CREDITS 
 Directed by Mischa Rozema Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott Production Company: PostPanic Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema Music & Sound Design: Hecq Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker Production Designer: Roland Mylanus Editor: Mischa Rozema Prague Cast: Main Hero: Vladan Bláha Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova Post-Production: PostPanic CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves 3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek 2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel 3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx 2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor Graphic Designs: Si Scott Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction Production (Prague) by Savage: Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari Producer: Michaela Berkova Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka Prop master: Jan Fiala Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs Location: CREVISTON, a.s. Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague


2. Year Zero - OFFF Barcelona 2011 Main Titles

  • Published: 2011-06-09T10:23:12+00:00
  • Duration: 382
  • By PostPanic

Following in the footsteps of Prologue Films and The Mill, PostPanic have created this year’s prestigious opening titles 'Year Zero' for OFFF Festival 2011 in Barcelona http://offf.ws/bcn2011/ Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people. DIRECTOR'S NOTES (By Mischa Rozema) This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place. This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations. So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero. There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie. Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival. To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare. We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; ) How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot. When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us). In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer. The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles. The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project. Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this. CREDITS 
 Directed by Mischa Rozema Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott Production Company: PostPanic Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema Music & Sound Design: Hecq Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker Production Designer: Roland Mylanus, Nicole Nieuwenhuis Editor: Mischa Rozema Prague Cast: Main Hero: Vladan Bláha Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova Post-Production: PostPanic CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves 3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek 2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel 3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx 2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor Graphic Designs: Si Scott Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction Production (Prague) by Savage: Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari Producer: Michaela Berkova Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka Prop master: Jan Fiala Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs Location: CREVISTON, a.s. Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague About OFFF Festival 2011 OFFF is an entity in continuous transformation, alive and evolutionary. More than a decade ago, it was born as a post-digital culture festival; a meeting place to host contemporary creation through an in depth program of conferences, workshops and performances by the most relevant artists of our time. These days, OFFF keeps being a reference event throughout the world. A festival hosted in Barcelona, New York, Lisbon and Paris which has featured renowned artists such as Joshua Davis, Stefan Sagmeister, John Maeda, Neville Brody, Kyle Cooper, The Mill, Digital Kitchen, Ben Fry & Casey Reas, Golan Levin, Chris Milk, Rob Chiu, Julien Vallée, Paula Scher, Rick Poynor, Erik Spiekermann, Dvein, Erik Natzke, Vincent Moon, Ze Frank, Alex Trochut, among others…The festival where a new generation of artists has originated and developed. All of them started attending OFFF as spectators. Today, they take up its main stage.


3. Monsoon II (4K)

  • Published: 2015-10-05T04:57:02+00:00
  • Duration: 627
  • By Mike Olbinski

Blu-Ray discs available here: http://www.mikeolbinski.com/shop/ Song by Kerry Muzzey: "Palladio Rebuilt" (on iTunes: http://bit.ly/pall_MO) Follow me: http://www.mikeolbinski.com / https://twitter.com/mikeolbinski / https://www.facebook.com/mikeolbinskiphotography / https://instagram.com/mikeolbinski ---------------------------------- I've been chasing the monsoon in Arizona for about 6-7 years now. This summer was different though. Back in late July, I was wondering why it felt like I was out chasing more than ever before. And then I remembered. I had a job last summer. This year I didn't. I went full-time photography in November of 2014 and haven't looked back. I was free to roam and had virtually no limitations. I even had multiple chases where I never actually wend to bed, but instead chased all night. I took the kids to New Mexico at one point early in the season. Last year I counted roughly 31 total days that I chased a storm during the monsoon. This summer: 48. Yikes. 17,000 miles driven, which was about 3,000 more than last year. Perhaps the biggest difference this year was shooting nearly 60,000 more time-lapse frames than I did in 2014. 105,000 total. And what sticks out to me even more than any of the other numbers above, is that only 55,000 of those 105,000 frames made it into Monsoon II. What that means is I was able to stuff this new film with only of the best of the best. We missed out on some of the huge dust storms like I've captured in years past, but overall, I think this represents some of the best weather I've ever photographed in Arizona. There are stunning shelf clouds, gorgeous rain shafts, lots of blowing dust, tons of lightning, and even multiple mini-supercells/mesocyclones. The brief meso over Cottonwood at the 3:38 mark is one of my all-time favorites. I can't talk much more about the film without addressing the music real quick. The song is called Palladio (Rebuilt) and it's once again by the amazing Kerry Muzzey who donated it to me for Monsoon II. He also let me use another song of his for my previous film, The Chase and I'm beyond grateful for his generosity. I mean, how do you thank someone enough for that? Click here to find the song on iTunes and please support his work! I've said it a million times...the music is at least 50% of these movies I make. Kerry's art helps bring my films to life. Thank you my friend! When I'm out there capturing footage for these films, I'm constantly thinking about the story I want to tell. For example, I wanted a lot of erupting, towering cumulus at the beginning to launch into the meatier clips. I started laying out the film back in mid-August. Certain clips I already knew would be in certain places in relation to the ups and downs of the song itself. As the season wore on, I gathered more and more clips and began to lay out the entire film. I'd remove clips when I got something better. There was exhausting editing, re-editing, looping music, reluctantly dropping clips that didn't work or were unfixable and watching it over, and over and over, to make sure I was telling the story I wanted to tell. At one point, about halfway through...I was telling Jina that I have a lot of great stuff, but still haven't shot the final scene yet. I had no idea what it would be, but I knew I didn't have it. And then that very night (or maybe the next day)...I was out west of Tonopah and I knew on the way home that the monsoon had finally delivered my ending. That is what is so amazing about doing this. You hit the road with zero idea about what you're going to see over the course of a summer. You might imagine scenarios or have ideas, but they get blown out of the water by reality. And that's what I love about it. My hope is that you can see and feel that love in this film. The beauty of the monsoon in Arizona. This is where I'm from and this is home. More on the story here: http://www.mikeolbinski.com/theblog/2015/10/monsoon-ii/ -------------------- Technical Details: Captured with Canon 5D3's, a 5D2, Canon 16-35mm, Rokinon 14, 24, 35 and 85mm. Processed using Lightroom, LR Timelapse, After Effects and Premiere Pro


4. CASSINI'S GRAND FINALE

  • Published: 2017-03-30T14:55:52+00:00
  • Duration: 220
  • By Erik Wernquist

CASSINI’S GRAND FINALE is a short film I had the great honor to produce for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) about the spectacular ending of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. It is meant as an inspirational and informative piece about what happens in the last months of the mission, and as a celebration of all that this historic spacecraft has achieved. Here is an article from JPL on the production of the film: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/3016/making-cassinis-grand-finale/ For the official JPL release of the film, please turn here: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/3013/nasas-cassini-mission-prepares-for-grand-finale-at-saturn/ or go directly to the official JPL YouTube video here: https://youtu.be/xrGAQCq9BMU For the official NASA release, please turn here: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-cassini-mission-prepares-for-grand-finale-at-saturn NASA’s Cassini spacecraft (launched in 1997) has been in orbit around Saturn since 2004 exploring the giant planet, its spectacular system of rings and moons. Cassini was also carrying with it the European Huygens Probe which was dispatched after arrival and successfully landed on the moon Titan, becoming the first human made craft to land on a surface in the outer solar system. In 2017 - after more than a decade of bringing home remarkably successful scientific achievements, discoveries and a treasury of gorgeous photos – the spacecraft is running out of fuel to maneuver. In order to protect the moons Enceladus and Titan, and their potentially life-bearing sub surface oceans, from possible contamination in the unlikely event of a future collision, it has been decided to take Cassini permanently out of service. This is done by crashing the spacecraft into the atmosphere of Saturn - but not without doing some amazing science on the way. 22 times, Cassini dives through previously unexplored gap between Saturn and its rings, collecting new data on the mass of the rings (used to help determine their age), measurements of Saturn’s gravity and magnetic fields (used to help understanding its internal structure) and sending home stunning views of Saturn’s clouds and the rings – seen from a closer range than ever before. Even up until the very end, Cassini will bring home data, as it tastes the atmosphere of Saturn, just minutes before burning up and becoming part of the planet itself. It has been an unprecedented honor for me to get to do this film. Being a passionate enthusiast of planetary science, Cassini is the one mission - more than any other – to define my interest in the field, as I’ve had the pleasure to follow its success, from start to end, for a major part of my adult life. For more information about the Cassini mission and its Grand Finale, please turn here: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ CREDITS: DIRECTOR – Erik Wernquist PRODUCERS – Preston Dyches (JPL), Stephen Epstein (JPL) MUSIC – Cristian Sandquist WRITER – Preston Dyches (JPL) NARRATOR – Stephanie Czajkowski COLORIST – Caj Müller EDITOR – Micke Lindgren VISUALS COMPOSITING & PRODUCTION – Erik Wernquist CASSINI MODELING – Svante Segelson CASSINI SHADING, TEXTURES & DYNAMICS – Per Jonsson SATURN BACKGROUND PAINTINGS – Greg Martin TITLES – Mikael Hall ADDITIONAL TEXTURES & BACKGROUNS – Svante Segelson ADDITIONAL COMPOSITING & PARTICLES – Mikael Hall Thank you NASA, JPL, ESA and the entire Cassini/Huygens team for making such a wonderful, successful and inspiring mission. And especially; thank you Cassini, and farewell. The solar system will feel empty without you.


5. Made to be Seen

  • Published: 2014-06-15T00:22:16+00:00
  • Duration: 301
  • By Joel Schat

First off thanks for watching my Nature DEMO REEL - Made to be Seen! To enjoy it in the best possible way turn the volume way up, Yell at everyone to be quiet and Dive into this film! If you have a blazing fast internet speed head on over to Youtube and choose 4K in the settings as the vimeo compression isn't the greatest! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzBsT1eWIpQ Follow along with my adventures: Facebook: http://facebook.com/joelschatphoto Instagram: http://instagram.com/joelschat http://joelschat.com Alright! So basically this is my nature demo reel! My passion for the past 2 years has been to show off Creation as best I know how, which lead me to mountain tops, canyons, beaches and all sorts of spectacular places! I have been so blessed to be able to witness some of the things I've seen in the past 2 years. Thankfully I have been able to follow this passion of mine and continue to travel as I am extremely fortunate to work for an amazing company called http://Roadtrippers.com which allows me to travel and document roadtripping! Our Films: http://vimeo.com/roadtrippers The hardest part of this film for me was finding the right song. It had been months of casual searching but finding nothing. Then one day while I was at home (Vancouver) sitting in church my pastor used this song to help prove a point, that we have a soul and that is what seperates us from the rest of nature, the second I heard it I knew it was perfect and I rushed home to start the editing process! The song is called: Saturn - Sleeping at Last http://sleepingatlast.com If you want to see exactly what goes into making one of my videos check out a day in my life while on the road here: https://vimeo.com/89324153 The equipment I used for this film includes a bunch of Canon gear: 5d2, 6d, 16-35, 24-70, 70-200, Rokinon 14mm (great for stars) Lee Filters A Bunch of Manfrotto tripods and my Motion Control! Dynamic Perception makes some fantastic Sliders and now a pan/tilt head that is sweet but its the stage 1 that really changed things for me. It makes it possible to bring a slider on a long hike or on the airplane as its carbon fiber and super light! DP Stage 1 Carbon and DP Stage 0 - http://dynamicperception.com Emotimo TB3 http://emotimo.com Promote Control (Best intervalometer I have by far) http://goo.gl/8aIWL F-stop Tilopa BC And of course I couldn't have done it without my VW Westfalia!! All of these clips are available in 4-6K, email me at joel@roadtrippers.com for inquires.


6. kid icarus // the screen printing duo

  • Published: 2011-06-01T16:45:27+00:00
  • Duration: 158
  • By stillmotion

working with bianca and michael of kid icarus was a blast. their shop is super cute, their location is in one of toronto's hippest neighborhoods, and their love for craft and handmade is infectious. while what they produce is impeccable, kid icarus is really just a two person shop. michael handles all of the production and bianca manages all of the pre and post production, among all of the other facets that go along with running a storefront. throughout the day they continue like busy bee's working apart but every so often they meet. what starts off as a split screen of the two of them working independently breaks when they meet in the middle to work together. the color of the piece was pushed as far as i could go in apple color to really bring out the saturated colors apparent in screen printed goods. one of the main differences between screen printing and digital printing is color; with screen printing, anything is possible - including crazy neon colors (colors that we have incorporated in to printed collateral, particularly the orange that is seen on many of the goods that kid icarus has printed for us), whereas with digital, you can only go so far. now, being that kid icarus is located in a small shop, we did run in to some challenges with lighting. luckily though, kid icarus is closed on monday's so we were able to film while the storefront was closed. setting up lights while the store was open would have been impossible. we ended up lighting from the outside of the shop when we lost the sun in the back of the building, and then lighting the interviews in the same direction of the sun when we lost the sun behind clouds. what i really love about this piece is that it was filmed in 1 day, about 6 hours to be exact, with 1 cinematographer, 1 assistant cinematographer / pa, and an AD. the ability to go in for a day, create a film about kid icarus and their process with relatively low impact is quite amazing to me. the power of these cameras and lenses continually blows me away. - justin ----------------------------------------------------------------- michael, of kid icarus, was kind enough to chime in on the process of being filmed and what it was like from their perspective: I'm always skeptical when someone wants to bring a class on a field trip, a group of tourists, or a film crew into our space. It's not that I get camera shy or nervous around groups of people. It's the fact that our space is about 300 square feet and once there are about 6 people in the store, you start to feel a little claustrophobic. Filming on a day that we were closed was important. Gear scattered all over the place, store product stashed into any corner possible, the store started to look like a packrat's den with just a thin clear path on the floor to get from one side of the room to the other. The folks at stillmotion were great. They put up with my random art direction and shot ideas, and also our many side tangents on whatever we decided to talk about that moment. The night before the shoot we were finishing up a job for the My City Lives Anniversary party. We were on a roll and decided to plow through the printing until it was done. It felt great to head home late that night with another project wrapped up. Bad idea. This left us unable to articulate anything on the day of the shoot. No amount of coffee helped, we were zombies. I'm surprised at the end result of the clip, it comes off really polished despite or lack of sleep. Some of the shots where we are in print production are my favourites, capturing the viscosity of the inks and the texture on the mesh, those look great in video. Alot of it was "1 shot only". From laying down a fresh bead of ink on a screen, to chopping down paper on the hydraulic cutter, it only happens once. When it comes to the physical printing portion, I generally rely on my core muscles to do most of the work . But there were quite a few overhead shots where I needed to shift my usual stance to accommodate cameras hovering over me. Awkward, yes, but I feel those made up the most interesting shots. It's pretty much what you'd see if you were printing. Overall it was an interesting experience, especially not really knowing what angle the crew wanted to take on everything. It was loads of fun explaining the process, doing what we do everyday, and just having people around to document it. ----------------------------------------------------------------- technical notes: we used the Mark IV's with a 4 lens kit (24, 35, 50 and 135) and a couple of lights when needed. there is 1 slider shot in the entire piece, everything else is with a monopod or tripod for the interviews. music is licensed through with etiquette. the artist is purse candy and the song is i need want it.


7. The Bull Rider

  • Published: 2015-05-04T18:30:09+00:00
  • Duration: 514
  • By Joris Debeij

This film made by I Am Los Angeles and was originally published by the New York Times Op-Doc Series. During summer breaks, my dad, who worked as a librarian, would bring home Westerns on VHS tape and we'd watch them together. I was fascinated and intrigued by the iconic cowboy characters living out an understated yet dramatic, high-stakes existence against such a spartan, other-worldly backdrop. Sure, much of this was a Hollywood fantasy, but the west truly was once the land of cowboys and indians. And now, in a relatively short period of time, things have changed quickly. Instead of sprawling ranches dotted with quiet loner cowboy types, the landscape is now largely populated by homogeneous residential communities and big box retailers. Perhaps out of a desire for life to seem simpler, and less encumbered by the lifestyle inherent to all our modern conveniences, I went looking for the closest thing I could find to that cowboy from the silver screen. This is how I happened upon Gary Leffew, an old-school yet surprisingly gregarious rodeo cowboy with some profound things to share about his philosophy on life and his sport. After meeting Mr. Leffew, I was haunted by this feeling that he represents an era that is slowly disappearing and becoming part of the region's history. It was this feeling that urged me to make a character-driven short film that would encapsulate his character, experiences with the sport of rodeo, and general outlook on life. You can see the film here part of the Op-Doc series of the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/08/opinion/the-bull-rider.html?_r=0


8. Cambodia

  • Published: 2010-08-12T20:54:26+00:00
  • Duration: 317
  • By Ke Nguyen

I was fortunate enough to spend 2 weeks in Cambodia, if you haven't yet been, go. I had an amazing time and would highly recommend visiting. Shot in HD on a Lumix GH1 with stock lens 14-140mm - (used for about 90% of the shots) and Nikkor 50mm f1.4. Music by Bonobo - Recurring --------------------------------- For those that are planning to go, here are my top 8 Cambodia travel tips (which are probably not unique to Cambodia): * The level of English was higher than I expected, but try to learn a few words in Khmer (Cambodian), even if it's only 'hello' and 'thank you', it goes a long way. * If you intend to buy a Lonely Planet before you come out -don't bother. There are lots of people (usually landmine victims) that sell them, they'll be more grateful that you buy a book from them than Amazon will ever be. * Even though there is some good stuff in the Lonely Planet, don't live by it, use it as a basic template. Remember that it's only 1-2 people's opinion. Check out sites like TripAdvisor.com and WikiTravel.org also restaurants and cafes will have free guides which are more up to date and written by people that live there. * Give the 'The Killing Fields' film a miss, it gives little explanation of what happened. Read Survival in The Killing Fields by Ngor Haing it's an amazing but horrific first hand account of what happened in Cambodia. * Bring small pocket change (pence/cents), you can dish them out to the kid sellers when you're not interested in buying their bracelets or books. Their money is in note form, so they hardly see coins and the kids went nuts for them. * It is generally safe but it's not unheard of that drive-by bag snatching occurs. Make sure your bag strap is around your torso and the bag in front of you, as opposed to on your shoulder by your side. I happen to witness one a few metres in front of me and the bag was snatched off a girl's shoulder as smooth as silk. * It does get tiresome and annoying that amputees constantly approach you to sell you postcards and books, but appreciate the fact that they're earning their keep as opposed to the able-bodied beggars here at home. * Remember to use your eyeballs, appreciate being there in the moment. Break the routine of thinking about composing shots and angles, leave the camera at the hotel for a day. The sad reality is that you'll probably spend more time looking at the scenery on a computer screen than you will with your eyeballs. Enjoy.


9. Bring It On Home

After we discovered Roger Ridley performing on the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica and asked him if we could record him singing the John Lennon version of “Stand By Me,” we were so blown away with his presence and enthusiasm toward music and people that we wanted to film his entire set. This song, “Bring It On Home,” Roger dedicated to Mark in that moment


10. A Canon 7D short: El Hueco

  • Published: 2009-12-17T01:00:40+00:00
  • Duration: 198
  • By gnarly bay

This was a spur of the moment project, shot during my recent vacation to Costa Rica. My good friend Jason Soares took me to a part of town that most people don't see, and introduced me to a woman named Rebecca "Bleu" Oleson. Bleu, along with a local church, has been helping to bring education to this underprivileged community. We were fortunate enough to be invited to their local Christmas Party and assist with the festivities. I was inspired by the dedication and passion Bleu had for these kids and wanted to document it. - shot with the 7d - 24mm lens - unscripted, not planned - only had the mic from the camera, so please excuse the sound. - edited on FCP during my flight home We have set up a Pay Pal account and will be collecting donations for the rest of the Holiday season. All donations will go directly to Bleu to help her keep doing what she's doing. If you are interested please visit: http://tiny.cc/bleu442


11. "Combatography" Afghanistan in 4K RED ONE - HD

  • Published: 2008-05-16T07:03:12+00:00
  • Duration: 384
  • By MrGlory

Footage I shot of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan 2008 on the RED ONE Digital Cinema Camera. I edited this piece together (using some footage from my previous Afghanistan clips) as a demo to show the capabilities of this new technology, and how it can bring quality, scalability, and longevity back to combat zone footage unseen since WWII/Viet Nam era. The actual resolution of the footage is 4096x2048, almost 5x full 1080P High Definition. I only had the camera for 5 days of shooting, and this is what I pieced together for concept presentation purposes. It is my hope that the DoD shows interest in assembling a specially trained team of service-members to film on this new equipment and provide footage to disseminate back to the public at a quality this generation deserves, both home and abroad. Jason Wingrove of FXGuide recently interviewed me regarding this footage and my thoughts on advancing this quality for Combat Zone acquisition. It is episode #015 here: http://www.fxguide.com/therc/red_centre_015/ There have been a couple magazine articles as well, High Definition #31 (Aug08), Government Video (Aug08) and Videography magazines (Aug08), and DV Magazine (Sep08). Camera = RED ONE Lens = Angenieux 20-120 T2.9 Music = Klaus Badelt - Rescue Dawn


12. AT THE EDGE OF THE SOLAR STORM - 4K

Before setteling down in Denmark, I, like most Danes, had no idea that one could possibly witness the northern lights. In 2015, as I was on the Ordrup beach in the northwest of Zealand (Sjælland), I was out taking pictures of the milky way on a clear night. My camera was facing east/north-east and I noticed an usual purple color in the upper left-hand corner of my frame. As I tried to investigate further, taking several shots in different directions, I was stunned by these green and purple sort of curtains. ‘It couldn’t possibly be…’ I thought. First thing in the morning, I asked one of my colleagues who had lived in the area for awhile, for a tangible explanation. ‘Well, it looks like you got lucky!’, he replied. I had just captured my first northern lights ever, and it was in Denmark! Of course the first shots looked horrible, as I didn’t know how to photograph them with the right settings. I rapidly discovered, despite the common opinion, that the northern lights are actually often visible in the country. As I got better at shooting them, I decided to make my case and prove that northern lights can be sighted in Denmark and encourage the Danes to go out and take a look! As of 2016, I recorded about 40 times where the light could be caught on camera, including about 20 times where they got bright enough to be seen with the naked eye. Although here is the trick. It is not as easy as it seems to capture the dancing glow in southern Scandinavia. Most of the time one will have to look towards the North, as the aurorae will appear just above the horizon. During a strong solar storm, they spread southwards and I have just recently witnessed a G4 display (Kp 8 on a scale of 9), that let me see the lights above my head for a couple of minutes (in the film: 2’47’’). The first thing to keep in mind is that the northern lights can only be seen on a clear, dark and cloudless night, almost year-round (excluding June and July when the nights are too bright). Clouds will just block the view and the moonlight will wash out the aurora. Now Denmark is under the influence of the Gulf stream, and on top of that, the country is surrounded by seas, creating very humid, windy and moist weather conditions. That will limit your chances for sure, as the pristine and sharp nightskies make a rare appearance. 
Secondly, you should not expect the aurora to be as strong as they can be up north, the reason being that since they are lower on the northern horizon, the light has to cross more atmosphere (so more gas or clouds) to reach your eye or camera. It is exactly like the sun getting dimmer and changing color during a sunset. That can be really challenging for photographers, because one has to boost up the camera settings (ISO, f/stop or exposure time) in a way that can either bring too much noise, too much vignetting or unsharp frames. Eventually one has to have a tremendous amount of patience as the northern lights are not served on a silver platter in Denmark! The NOAA and space weather forecasters are doing their best to predict geomagnetic storms, and in that way, give you an aurora forecast, but because of the setbacks stated earlier, and also the fact that predictions are just a probability and not a certainty, you are not necessarily going to be rewarded all the time. What my film does not show is that I have spent hundreds of hours, shot thousands of pictures and walked long distances in the Odsherred shire to come to this result. Many times I have stayed and waited for hours, static in the cold, for the aurora to show up, and many times I have come home empty-handed. That’s what makes aurora hunting so exciting in Denmark, because you don’t know for sure what you are going to get. However when they appear in front of you, I can assure you that it is such a rush of adrenaline. You don’t really know what’s happening in front of you. The whole northern horizon catches on fire and the majestic pillars remind you of how small you are. It is a such a magnificent, unbelievable and humbling experience. I tried to shoot the Danish aurora as well as I could, to showcase their patterns, shapes, movements and colors. The Danish perspective actually gives another dimension and experience to the northern lights. Since you see them from the edge of the storm, they offer the full spectrum of their colors, from green to purple and blue. They put on a great show as they advance towards you in a magical explosion, and rightfully so, because they actually look like curtains opening and closing on the Baltic scene. I have had so many emotional adventures shooting the aurora in Denmark, and I encourage everyone living or visiting Denmark to get out of town, away from the disturbing city lights, bring a warm blanket and enjoy the Danish aurora! More details about the film at: www.adphotography-online.com


13. What is a Warrior?

  • Published: 2012-12-19T00:17:39+00:00
  • Duration: 260
  • By Aubrey Marcus

by @WarriorPoetUS and brought to life by the talent and vision of @Notthisbody For more by Aubrey Marcus visit the Warrior Poet blog: http://www.warriorpoet.us To connect with Not This Body, visit notthisbody.com A collaboration of /Aubrey Marcus and /Notthisbody incorporating work by /MuratPak /SamPriceWaldman /GavinKeech /SethHunter /Karmicfix /JuanIrache /TimBorgmannPlexus /DarekNicoletto /Semiconductor /ThorstenFleisch /GrantKayl /AminSadeghvand /AlexanderCleland /EliotSellers /AndreyMouratov /KimPimmel /shlohmo /CherylColan /AndrewFilippone /PageStephenson /footage from The Sagan Series /footage from The Fayman Series /footage from Carl Sagan Tribute Series Music: Hawk Cliff by Enzo Carlino soundcloud.com/enzo-carlino/hawk-cliff * A special thanks to Jason Silva for inspiring me to enter this genre. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Full Text: What is a warrior? A warrior is a way of life, a way of thinking, a way of being. Carlos Castaneda says we choose only once, to be warriors or ordinary. We choose only once. Because choosing to be a warrior alters your fundamental approach to life. While others will view everything as a blessing or a curse, you see only challenges. And a warrior lives to overcome challenges. Every warrior has a code, an ethos. It is an invisible thread that connects him to all of his warrior brothers and sisters since the beginning of time. Steven Pressfield asks “How do we find our true calling, our soul companions, our destiny? He answers, “In this task, our mightiest ally is the warrior ethos.” A warrior never hopes, but he must have faith. Hope is powerless, useless... The longer we sit and hope the more time we waste, because the universe gives only what is sought, what is believed! But yet a warrior must have faith. Because at times not every path is clear, and not every enemy a fiery dragon. When the forest is dark the warrior holds his ground with faith that if he remembers the warrior code, the light to illuminate the darkness will come. For the warrior, the body is as important as the mind, because the two are inseparable. Danielle Bolleli writes “ A person who knows there is a wild wolf living under the skin has less reason to be intimidated by reality. Even when the power of the mind is in doubt, the body can provide tangible proof.” A warrior is not an ascetic. He does not deny himself the pleasures of conquest simply for the sake of denying them. He realizes that in denying oneself it is easy to think he is doing great things, when really he is just focused on himself. But neither is the warrior attached to these pleasures. He can walk away from them at any time, and sometimes he does, just to prove it to himself. The warrior is a natural leader, and he leads under one principle-- Follow me. When Alexander the great was threatened with mutiny after years of a brutal campaign in India, he stripped down naked, so all the men could see his scars. “Bring forth a man who has bled more than me, and we will go home.” No one came forth, because it was Alexander, riding his horse Bucephalus with a double plumed helmet who led every charge. Instead, his men erupted in cheers and pounded their shields. The Warrior is a Believer. As Paulo Coelho says, “Because he believes in miracles, miracles begin to happen. Because he is sure that his thoughts can change his life, his life begins to change. Because he is certain that he will find love, love appears.” A warrior is highly tuned to sense danger, but he does not fear. He does not fear because pain is temporary and death is an illusion. What is eternal cannot die, and the warrior knows that he will laugh, he will love, and he will fight for all eternity, in this world or some other. If he errs, if he wanders, if he indulges in self pity, if he complains... He does not despair. He knows that he is human, and he remembers the choice he made. He picks his sword back up from the ground, and resumes the path of the warrior. A warrior fights for one reason alone: love. Love of life, love of what is good, love of family, love of tribe, and love of our infinite soul on the quest for impeccability. He lets love swell in his heart, flushing through every cell in his being until he cannot help but proclaim, like Cyrano De Bergerac, “I am going to be a storm -- a flame -- I need to fight whole armies alone. I have ten hearts! I have a hundred arms! I feel too strong to war with mortals. Bring me GIANTS!”


14. CREATIE | John Mescall, 8 things that inspire me.

  • Published: 2016-10-07T09:05:12+00:00
  • Duration: 196
  • By Ambassadors

On behalf of Adformatie, the Dutch advertising trade magazine, Nils Adriaans approached Ambassadors to team up for a creative piece on John Mescall’s 8 inspirational sources. In started off as a simple interview between Adriaans and Mescall, who is the creative director for ‘Dumb ways to die’, but accelerated into a printed 8-page section and animated short film to accompany the story. Adriaans: “First of all, John was really cooperative – a big thanks goes out to McCann New York (where Mescall works as Global Executive Creative Director and Global Creative Council President at McCann Worldgroup). Second of all Ambassadors took it home big time, both creatively and production wise. The whole project felt like a gift.’ Mescall’ story came to life using a voice-over and there is no better person than himself to record his own words. His calm, Australian accent becomes a strong inspiration and sets the tone for the rest of the project. “From that moment on it became a team effort, says Vincent Lammers, head of Design & Animation, using up every spare moment to design and animate every aspect of the short film. All designers were given complete freedom to experiment based on the given interview script, which resulted in almost 20 different approaches. So for every chapter we adopted a specific style using either paper animations, 3D animations, pencil animations and a lot more making it a showcase of all our in-house design talent.” Illustrator Ewoudt Boonstra, who has worked with Ambassadors several times before, also joined forces with the creative team and contributed an animated piece. Breezy vibe A guiding colour palet, John Mescall’s voice and music by Joep Meijburg, Composer & Sound Designer, form a strong line through all the chapters. As Meijburg puts it, “Mescall’s voice was a strong inspiration, especially his calmness and laid-back rhythm gave me an instant feeling I wanted to bring across. The music needed a breezy vibe to support the visuals and the voice-over.” “In a very early stage I got so excited because the music was hitting the vibe I wanted to bring across, says Meijburg, so I called up Vincent and we started high five-ing.” For both – Lammers and Meijburg – the creative freedom in this project is the cherry on the cake, keeping the spontaneity in every second. The music and visuals came together in a beautiful way bringing Mescall’s words to life in print and in animation. Adriaans adds: “I truly hope we can do international inspirational collaborations like this more often.” --- Created by Ambassadors Design & Animation Director: Vincent Lammers Executive Producer: Nils Adriaanse
Associate Design & Animation Director: Jurriën Boogert, Nick Groeneveld.
Design & Illustration: Maureen van der Hout, Ewoudt Boonstra, Aylin Buyruk, Jurriën Boogert, Nick Groeneveld, Vincent Lammers.
Animation: Jurriën Boogert, Nick Groeneveld, Vincent Lammers, Rink Hof, Denise Nedermeijer, Iris van den Akker.
Music & Sound Design: Joep Meijburg


15. Australia 8k HDR

  • Published: 2017-02-11T13:59:06+00:00
  • Duration: 378
  • By 3motion

Nothing happens unless first a dream - Carl Sandburg If you would ask me, what influenced me most, when I was a teenager, I would mention this quote of Carl Sandburg. It was printed on a poster of Uluṟu, which was called Ayers Rock in the 1990s outside of Australia. For over ten years that poster was hanging around and I had seen it every day. It is not surprising that the wish to travel to Down Under became stronger each year. Finally in 2010 I did my first trip to Australia, a further trip followed. And I returned again in 2015 - this time I wanted to bring back something for everybody staying at home - Australia’s Nature. Incredible coast lines like the Twelve Apostel, Byron Bay, Cape Conran (Thanks Helmut :), Queensland coast from Daintree to Gold Coast and the outback with simply nothing for thousands of kilometers and than suddenly the Uluṟu or the Devil Marbles. Many trips starting and ending in the big cities of Australia - but you haven’t been to Australia, if you just stay there. It is not all about Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne …. you have to go out and experience that continent on your own. The film starts and ends in the cities, but between you will see what you could see in three weeks of that amazing land. We couldn’t be everywhere, but one day we will return and perhaps we will bring you another piece of nature from Down Under. The outcome of the last trip is a 8k time-lapse in true HDR. Not that tone-mapping thing - it is real HDR for the newest displays. But that is only available on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISJMsVhY5Yk Thanks for the fantastic soundtrack and mix to Kriz Mental for this 8K / 4K / UHD timelapse. Thanks to Alex for the title design and for polishing the graphics for this time lapse again. Thanks to Stef for her support to realize this Australia timelapse. Join me on Twitter: twitter.com/ronald_3motion Follow me on Instagram: instagram.com/ronald_3motion


16. Bring It On Home To Me

  • Published: 2012-07-25T13:58:25+00:00
  • Duration: Unknown
  • By Ron Vod

Nia Covington, itate@rr.oh.com


17. farzana+shameer - ken + barbie, meet bollywood.

  • Published: 2010-08-02T05:49:04+00:00
  • Duration: 310
  • By Michael Y Wong

LATEST UPDATES - 2012 international educational schedule will be constantly updated in the upcoming months (bottom of post). thank you. added boracay, philipines july 2012. http://mayadacademy.com/ // k where do i begin?!! this summer has been incredibly busy, from vancouver, to miami, to sydney, to hawaii, to niagara falls (haha k this is only a 200km drive) shooting weddings, teaching workshops, shooting corporate promos + commercials and of course shooting more weddings. things are taking longer then expected but b4 i launch my website + 2010 highlights; i want to quickly share with you the first ever myw multi day south asian wedding that i attended this past weekend. while i've had the oppurtunity to shoot hindu and sikh indian weddings in the past this was the first time i've shot a 5 day (yes 5 day) Ismaili wedding; and i sure had a TON of learning to do. I was up with farzana + shameer @ their place (luckly they live 2 mins away from me!! hehe) till 5 am, after a 4 hour pre-wedding consultation to learn exactly all of the different rituals, ceremonies, scarves, certain drinks that have cultural/religious/mythological significance to them and their culture. needless to say my head pretty much exploded but i was pumpppppeed to make this happen. and while its hard to not notice, farzana + shameer are obviously a stunning looking couple, but they are also super warm, down to earth, approachable, caring and just all around awesome!!! their bridal party, friends and family were supppper amazing as well. i REALALLLLLLYY love you guys!!! thank you for having me document your wedding. TECHNICAL + PRODUCTION TIDBITS for my industry friends and colleagues. - being a multi-day event requiring many symmetrical ceremonies happening @ the same time, I contracted my internationally acclaimed wedding cinematographer/educator/best friend konrad czystowski to help me shoot the events that i couldnt personally shoot myself due to logistical limitations. one of the most important lessons l learned from internationally acclaimed ray roman while teaching @ his workshop in miami a month ago; was that he stressed how important it is to build solid relationships with great, honest and genuine ppl who can help us in our journey in this industry. in turn, konrad brings me to shoot a wedding with him in hawaii... WOOHOO!!! now to give you an idea of how much work was involved in this weddng, here is a breakdown. -WEDNESDAY henna ceremony - shot by myw + 1 5D mkii. the ceremony was 6 hours. -THURSDAY henna ceremony for the bridesmaids + women from the grooms side of the family. this is the day where the siblings of both the bride and groom goto the mosque and fill up the guri with holy water and bring it back home for the bride and groom to bathe in it. various other ceremonies (egging of the groom, eating of butter chicken (heheh), more to be explained below) also occur on thursday as well. i would say this was another 7 hours or so. both Konrad and myself used one Canon 5D mkII to cover everything. konrad @ groom's house while I was at the brides. -FRIDAY this was the day the bride and groom, as well as both their respective families get to finally meet and see eachother, this was @ a reception gathering. I shot this mostly myself with Konrad helping out for 3 hours. Total amount of time I would say I was shooting on and off was another 10 hours. -SATURDAY this was the break day where no shooting was involved and I basically went through a good 30 hours of footage and edited + transcoded between multiple machines straight an entire day (and night). Konrad's pre sequenced and rough-cut timelines were a huge help in making this possible. -SUNDAY I marched on the big wedding day on SUNDAY without a single second of sleep. Yes I almost cried in agony from editing during the middle of the night. Nevertheless, Konrad was at my house 7:45am, and the worlds busiest/most talented 16 year old boy wonder cinematographer Mark Klassen arrived too, and my trusty protege from scratch and Troy Turgano also helped with the editing duties all day. This wedding day ran from 8 am to about 1am, and had 2 sets of preps, 2 first meetings, 2 photosessions, 1 wedding ceremony and 1 wedding reception. this piece was shot entirely with Canon 5DmkII's in 24p mode. there is no doubt that the 5Dmkii currently provides the highest value/dollar HDSLR in event filmmaking industry today. it is better then the 7D due to it's full frame capabilities, cleaner low light and richer color reproduction. when i compare the 5d to the 1dmk4; I do notice that the 1dmk4 is better in low light, and the 1dmk4's crop factor is better in certain cases (removing mild vignetting in some lenses as well as removing the less sharp image characteristics @ the edges of an image); but for the price of a single 1dmk4, i can purchases 2 5dmkii's. it's a complete no brainer. - as both konrad and I taught in sydney australia 2 weeks ago and did a zeiss vs. eos lens comparison, there are pros and cons with everything depending on usage, application and situation. my glass used: -zeiss 35/2 zf, zeiss 50/2 makro zf, zeiss 21/2.8 zf, zeiss makro 100/2 konrad's glass used: -canon 50/1.2 L, canon 24/1.4 L II, canon 135/2 L ZEISS VS CANON glass - sometimes when looking @ konrad's footage, I want to go back to canon and pick up the 50/1.2 and 24/1.4L II for its INCREDIBLE low light and beautiful image capabilities as a result of its aperture, but i am taken back by the zeiss' lack of CA, the beautiful more filmic look (to me), its INCREDIBLE sharpness; and of course its VALUE/dollar. *edit* all colour correction was done via combination of fcp rgb balance, 2-way + 3-way colour correcter, newbluefx as well as trusty magic bullet. they are custom proflies that i have modifed and created over the years and have recently really tweaked them as now i have settings that are specific to zeiss + canon lenses. they work in tandem with the heavily modifed picture styles profiiles that i set based upon the lenses that i am using. (ie. for zeiss lenses, contrast is always turned to the lowset when shooting indoors, and slightly turned down when shooting in normal lighting).* STABILIZATION tools were handled cinevate atlas 30, manfrotto monopod 561hdv (this is an INCREDIBLE tool) at the BEST price ($300), the 561 serves as a tripod, a fake slider, a fake crane, a fake car/boat mount etc etc etc. just use your imagination and the sky is the limit with this badboy. STEADICAM; konrad performed the steadicam duties for this wedding since i ran steadicam for him all seasson and that fact that i was completely BEAT! he used his brand new Steadicam Pilot for all the shots and he pretty much killed and nailed every single shot on his first attempt. for those of you who follow me and my work, ive always stated that the Steadicam Pilot provides the best performance/dollar value for the money in the realm of the HDSLR film maker. it's 10 lb. weight limit will forever and ever be able to support small 'photo cameras' with over 99% of the lenses out there. it uses the same iso-elastic arm design as the 70k steadicams out there. Thank you to our friends @ Steadicam for the help with this one! this was the same day edit without any sort of modifications and played exactly as it did the night of the wedding. i normally do not showcase same day edits (but will show ALL highlights) online, but am making the exception in this case as so many hours and seat went into this piece. i will have the reaction from the b+g, their bridal party as well as their love story up later this week as well. thank you so much for watching, reading, emails, well wishes across the various forums and online community in these past months. -myw follow me via facebook - film@michaelywong.com twitter.com/ michaelywong if you would like to share films; feel free to add me as a contact ton vimeo. thank you. 2012 EDUCATIONAL SCHEDULE. ==================== looking forward to meeting many of you in the near future as I will be speaking @: infocus // charleston; south carolina USA // jan 2012 *thank you to my friends, colleagues + students alike for the wonderful reception given to me* www.infocusvideoevent.com exposed down under // sydney; australia // early july 2012 myw returns to Australia for the first time in 2 years. www.exposeddownunder.com mayad academy // boracay; philipines // late july 2012 myw is honoured to share the stage alongside some of Philippines top event/broadcast talent. http://mayadacademy.com/ FULL 2012 educational schedule will be continuously updated throughout the year. pps. to my industry colleagues who ever end up having an opportunity to document an Ismalli indian wedding, here is all the homework that i've done that can hopefully help you out. TROUSEAU (sp?) - boxes are gifts containing different outfits for the bride to wear. each box took farzanas mother 10 hours to make; their were 52 of them in total. MENDI/HENNA - is the application of the beautiful art that you see on skin of the bride. it signifies celebration; it is believed that the darker the henna is the more the groom is loved by the bride; hence farzana bathed with her arms and legs in garbage bags to prevent the henna from lightening. GHARI - the pot that contains the holy water that the bride and groom are to be bathed in before the wedding. the siblings of the bride and groom acquire the holy water from the mosque, have to put the guri on top of their heads, not say a single word, go back to their parents and have a little bit of a friendly gift game b4 finally releasing the guri to thier parents. upon having recieived the holy water bath, the bride and groom must carry a lime with a pin in it if they are ever to leave the house before the wedding. SHERBAT - ceremonial drink that is consumed pretty much all the time during the wedding celebration. it is basically stawberry milkshake so im going to have to embarrassingly admit that i had too many of these sherbat's. SAPATIA - claypot filled with concoctions (lentils, silver) that is broken by the b+g upon the end of every ritual. PITHI - tumeric with water + milk, this is applied to the b+g so that they will glow during the wedding. oil of olay was substituted :) for farzana and shammer's "friends" felt that eggs would make him glow better then tumeric/oil of olay =) MILK CEREMONY - 7 married women put milk on brides head for blessing (i think they ran out of beautiful married women so beautiful engaged women were substituted in certain cases) BATH CEREMONY - the water from the guri is baths the bride and groom; but they are not allowed to react to it in any way. TROUSEAUs are given by the bride's parents to the bride to start her new life. Also, the women in the groom's family come bringing truseaux's for the bride and each member of the groom's family is blessed by the bride's mother and then given a gift BANDANI - sacred scarf to protect bride and groom from evil HENNA on the groom - groom is supposed to put the initials of his bride on his hand, but instead he put the initials of him and his bride instead. he also got a heart with an arrow through it as well which isnt customary :)


18. A GH4 IN THE FIELD - C300/C100 INTERCUT

  • Published: 2014-07-13T15:45:17+00:00
  • Duration: 251
  • By Nicos A.

After having spent a week with the GH4 (https://vimeo.com/98463281) I had to fly to Georgia in the Caucasus to direct a documentary for France 5, one of the french national TV channels. I thought that it would be the perfect opportunity to test the GH4 in a real production environment and see how it would match our C300 and C100 in the field. Here is a quick edit of the results. Note that I am not a colorist nor a pixel peeper but a director and DP that is trying to understand his tools and share what he learned. All shots were only slightly graded in Premiere CS6 using the basic color correction tools to match exposure and roughly set the black/white/saturation levels. All C300/C100 shots are C-Log. All GH4 shots use the Neutral profile with sharpness and noise reduction set to -5, contrast and saturation between -3 and -5, depending on the scene. Master Pedestral was set to +10. This is the profile that work best for me after doing some test during my first week. But you are welcome to share yours ! I didn’t try to match the tints as I wanted to check the results «out of the camera», sort of. Note that the GH4 had a Schneider True Match Vari ND in front of the lens, so that may give it a twist. So, What did I learn ? Looking at the landscape shots from the GH4, I have to say that I am pretty impress with the results. Shooting in 4k and editing on a 1080p timeline gives a pretty close match in terms of resolution and a very nice rendering to my taste. On the dynamic range side, the GH4 is definitely not as good as the Canon cameras. It maybe not completely obvious of those scenes but the GH4 just can’t handle as much difference between highlights and shadows. The reason for that is the noise level. All shots on the C300 where done between 850 and 1600 ISO when the GH4 was set to 200 ISO. To my eyes, the noise of the GH4 is as visible at that setting as 1600 ISO on the C300. The other thing I noticed is that the GH4 can be very noisy on the dark part of the image. When for instance shooting a mountain top with a forest below, setting the exposure to protect the sky, the forest, although clearly visible, would become really noisy. Even though it seemed to capture those dark stops, it was capturing it with a lot of noise. For me it means that protecting the highlights and underexposing like you could do on a C300 is problematic on the GH4 as the grade would bring too much noise. For the same reason I think that trying to increase dynamic range with picture profiles will only show noisier shadows. On the other side, the GH4 has some great tools that the C300 does not. It can do time lapses straight in camera, which is a big time saver and a very cool feature ! I used that feature a lot during our shooting (only one shot in this edit) and I am very pleased not to have to bring another photo camera just for those. On the C300 the under-crank is just rubbish. The GH4 also has very cool slow-motion possibilities. I didn’t use those during this shooting because it wouldn’t match our story. But for music videos, shorts and more creative shooting, that is definitely a plus. Technical limitations asides, the GH4 proved to be a really great tool for our shooting environment. When shooting abroad in remote areas, we usually take with us a C300 as our A camera and a C100 as a B camera. But when conditions of shooting imply long hiking sessions or when battery life becomes more important than IQ, the C300 just stays home and the C100 becomes the A camera. It’s in those situations that I was really hopping the GH4 could be a good sidekick. It’s form factor, size, weight, battery life and media capacity just make it the perfect tool for those kind of jobs. With only a battery grip, a vari ND and a reference mic, I was able to shoot all day in all conditions, even when riding a horse ! On the other side the EVF is not as good as the one on the C300, the screen is not very bright, but who cares ? It gets the job done ! The ability to set a free-run timecode alone is a big time saver in post production. But the real test was to see how well I could match the Canon cameras and the GH4. Looking at the two cameras side by side, and especially the interview parts, I think that they intercut nicely, even with minimum post-production. And for me this is the most important. In the end, the GH4 maybe not be the perfect camera but the C300 and C100 aren’t either. What matters is how effective it can be on the field. How it can help us tell stories, be more responsive and travel lighter. // Gear // GH4 Panasonic 12-35 Schneider True-Match Vari ND 77mm Cordvision 58-77 adapter C300 & C100 EF 17-55 EF 70-300 L EF 24-105 L C300 & GH4 operated by Nicos A. C100 operated by Manuel Lgr Music : შენმა სურვილმა დამლია


19. Title Drops

  • Published: 2017-06-02T01:44:04+00:00
  • Duration: 271
  • By Roman Holiday

Fresh new month, fresh new montage. Been a while folks. I've gathered many more followers. A big thanks to all you people. Shouldn't be this long a wait for the next montage. I have quite a few going on and this was the one I deemed finished first. I'm not the first guy to tackle a collection of films where a character says the title of the film. We've had a bunch of recent movies do it though so I figured I'd give the most up to date and comprehensive version I can. All told there are a 150 examples. For this particular montage it may seem redundant, but here are the titles of the films featured: 00:01 - Suicide Squad (2016) 00:09 - Hot Tub Time Machine (2010) 00:11 - 50/50 (2011) 00:12 - Angels In The Outfield (1994) 00:13 - From Dusk Til Dawn (1996) 00:14 - Bend It Like Beckham (2002) 00:16 - Earth Girls Are Easy (1988) 00:17 - Peggy Sue Got Married (1986) 00:18 - Big (1988) 00:19 - Double Jeopardy (1999) 00:20 - Double Indemnity (1944) 00:22 - Bride Of Frankenstein (1935) 00:24 - The Third Man (1949) 00:25 - Witness For The Prosecution (1957) 00:27 - A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) 00:28 - Ace In The Hole (1951) 00:29 - On The Waterfront (1954) 00:30 - Some Like It Hot (1959) 00:31 - To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) 00:33 - Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) 00:35 - The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) 00:36 - Vertigo (1958) 00:37 - Rear Window (1954) 00:38 - Cat On A Hot Tin Roof (1958) 00:41 - Me And You And Everyone We Know (2005) 00:46 - Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) 00:47 - The Right Stuff (1983) 00:49 - Tough Guys Don't Dance (1987) 00:50 - Point Break (1991) 00:52 - Vanilla Sky (2001) 00:54 - Full Metal Jacket (1987) 00:58 - Good Morning, Vietnam (1987) 01:02 - The Englishman Who Went Up A Hill But Came Down A Mountain (1995) 01:05 - Clear And Present Danger (1994) 01:06 - A Bridge Too Far (1977) 01:08 - I Love You, Man (2009) 01:10 - I Love You, Beth Cooper (2009) 01:12 - I Love You Philip Morris (2009) 01:14 - Eight Legged Freaks (2002) 01:16 - Wild At Heart (1990) 01:18 - Fried Green Tomatoes (1991) 01:20 - Guardians Of The Galaxy (2014) 01:22 - Death Proof (2007) 01:24 - This Is Spinal Tap (1984) 01:25 - Kingdom Of Heaven (2005) 01:27 - Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (1967) 01:29 - Any Given Sunday (1999) 01:30 - Are We There Yet? (2005) 01:32 - Dude, Where's My Car? (2000) 01:33 - I Know Who Killed Me (2007) 01:34 - Demolition Man (1993) 01:35 - Total Recall (1990) 01:37 - Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here (1969) 01:40 - What About Bob? (1991) 01:42 - We Bought A Zoo (2011) 01:44 - Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot (1992) 01:47 - First Blood (1982) 01:48 - Do The Right Thing (1989) 01:49 - Free Willy (1993) 01:50 - Layer Cake (2004) 01:51 - Snatch (2000) 01:52 - The Italian Job (2003) 01:53 - Pain & Gain (2013) 01:54 - Lethal Weapon (1987) 01:55 - The Big Lebowski (1998) 01:57 - Face/Off (1997) 02:01 - Sleepless In Seattle (1993) 02:02 - Home Alone (1990) 02:03 - Evil Under The Sun (1982) 02:05 - A Perfect World (1993) 02:06 - Above The Law (1988) 02:07 - You Only Live Twice (1967) 02:08 - For Your Eyes Only (1981) 02:10 - A View To A Kill (1985) 02:12 - The Living Daylights (1987) 02:13 - License To Kill (1989) 02:14 - The World Is Not Enough (1999) 02:15 - Die Another Day (2002) 02:17 - Our Idiot Brother (2011) 02:18 - Clueless (1995) 02:19 - The Hard Way (1991) 02:20 - She's All That (1999) 02:21 - Failure To Launch (2006) 02:22 - Chinatown (1974) 02:23 - As Good As It Gets (1997) 02:24 - Premium Rush (2012) 02:26 - Back To The Future (1985) 02:27 - The Godfather (1972) 02:28 - The Exorcist (1973) 02:29 - The Curse Of The Mummy's Tomb (1964) 02:31 - Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974) 02:33 - The Man Who Shook The Hand Of Vincente Fernandez (2012) 02:36 - The Eagle Has Landed (1976) 02:38 - Law Abiding Citizen (2009) 02:40 - Salmon Fishing In The Yemen (2011) 02:41 - Deep Blue Sea (1999) 02:43 - Inherent Vice (2014) 02:45 - Sound Of My Voice (2011) 02:47 - I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell (2009) 02:48 - Hobo With A Shotgun (2011) 02:52 - That Was Then... This Is Now (1985) 02:55 - They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969) 02:58 - My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done? (2009) 03:01 - Truly Madly Deeply (1990) 03:02 - Paper Towns (2015) 03:03 - Taxi Driver (1976) 03:04 - Raging Bull (1980) 03:05 - The Wolf Of Wall Street (2013) 03:07 - All That Jazz (1979) 03:09 - Definitely, Maybe (2008) 03:11 - Trouble With The Curve (2012) 03:12 - Maximum Overdrive (1986) 03:13 - Vertical Limit (2000) 03:14 - Sudden Death (1995) 03:15 - Con Air (1997) 03:16 - Rush Hour (1998) 03:17 - Training Day (2001) 03:18 - Cashback (2006) 03:20 - Unthinkable (2010) 03:21 - Superman Returns (2006) Remaining titles shall be listed in the comments below. Disclaimer: I do not own any of the films used in this compilation. I mean I have some of them on DVD but I don't have the copyrights for them so don't sue me.


20. GALAXIES Vol. 1 - 4K (UHD)

You are lying on a blanket on a clear summer night and gazing at the dark starry sky. You are trying to spot the big dipper, Andromeda, or maybe Orion. However you are noticing strange bright patches aligned in a band across the night sky and realize they are not stars: it is our home town, our own galaxy, the milky way. That’s how all star-gazing experiences, hobbies, but also the history of astronomy began: from naked eye observations thousands of years ago, to the finest and biggest telescopes today, capable of unravelling the most intriguing secrets of the universe. As the hobby or science grows and evolves, we always want to go deeper and zoom in. You are now seeing not only our galaxy, but billions of them!

 With the first opus of the short film series ‘Galaxies’, I wanted to experiment and take the astro-timelapse technique to the next level. There are a lot of sumptuous short films and very technical time-lapses featuring the milky way, but I found very little variation in this field. Most of the time they show a wide-angle view of the milky way, albeit majestic, rising or setting against various foregrounds. This is the reason why I wanted to rethink the whole process, find different angles, get more detail. Why not zoom in? Why not consider other deep-sky objects like other galaxies? Why not show our very space home address and neighborhood in a very different way? 

I started thinking about making time-lapse of deep-sky objects about three years ago when I bought my tracker. I would experiment and track the Andromeda galaxy moving in front of rocks, monuments, trees, behind northern lights. I extended the limits of wide-field astro-timelapse (10-35mm) to a more middle (50-85mm) and narrow-field (> 85mm). It gives a lot of new options and reveals the true beauty and detail of our galactic core fore example. 

 The main canvas of the project is based on our galaxy and their neighbors (Andromeda, the Magellanic clouds..), but also a lot more deep-sky objects like nebulas, star clusters etc… Amateurs and professionals will certainly recognize a multitude of them like the North-American nebula, the Orion nebula, the Rosette nebula, the Carina nebula, the dark horse nebula, the Andromeda galaxy in different situations like photobombed by northern lights or moving behind the tree canopy, the majestic milky way core either rising or in very fine detail moving fleeting gently across the nigh sky… You will still find some wide-angle milky way scenes, because you just cannot pass on them! My two favorite parts of the project (and the most technically difficult) were shooting the Andromeda galaxy in the aurorae for one, and shooting a scene of the Orion constellation along with its nebulae, including nature and the zodiacal lights for the other. The former was hard to realize because of my location at the time of shoot (Denmark) since we don’t get aurorae too often. I needed to find a calm night (no wind for tracking), with an aurora storm but not too bright either (so one can still see the detail in the galaxy). It also needs to be at that time year when Andromeda passes low on the horizon, coinciding with the space where northern lights would appear. It was the most technical time-lapse I have ever done so far, but the most rewarding! The latter was also difficult, but paid off incredibly well. My goal was to get the red of the emission nebulae in the region of Orion that would still be visible in single pictures of the time-lapse, since you cannot stack and bring out detail! I astro-modified my Canon 6D to get the shot, and included the beautiful zodiacal lights towards the west, and even got a surprise visitor (grey heron) if you can spot it! 
I shot a various locations to get a variety of shots: Denmark (northern light, Andromeda, some milky way), Malawi (Milky way core and nebulas), France (star trails), Tenerife (Milky way core and wide-field), Vermont (wide field milky way) and Slovenia (milky way). Since I basically started this project a few years back when I began with astrophotography, some scenes still contain annoying flickering or weren’t as sharp as the ones I get now, but all in all I am truly amazed by the result and I really hope you can appreciate this new view on astro time-lapse. I should mention that this kind of technique demands a lot of work on thinking, preparing, executing and post-processing, and it took me about two years to achieve it.

 Material: 
Canon 6D (Baader modded), Sony a7rII, Sony a7s Multiple lenses ranging from 10mm to 500mm iOptron Skyguider tracker
Pre-processed in Lr and post-processed in Final Cut Pro X
 You can find more information about the film at adphotography-online.com. Thank you for watching and I hope you enjoyed the marvels of galaxies as much as I did. Don’t hesitate to like, comment, share and of course follow me for more 4K videos!


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