Feel It Still



1. Danielle

I attempted to create a person in order to emulate the aging process. The idea was that something is happening but you can't see it but you can feel it, like aging itself. Still Photographer: Keith Sirchio Animator: Nathan Meier Animator: Edmund Earle Nuke Artist: George Cuddy Music: Mark Reveley http://markreveley.bandcamp.com/ https://soundcloud.com/markreveley ©2013 Anthony Cerniello


2. Portugal. The Man - "Feel It Still" (Official Video)

Official video for "Feel It Still" Go to http://feelitstill.com for the full interactive version of the video. There you'll find 30 tools of #theresistance to fight apathy and injustice hidden in the film. Download/Stream: https://Atlantic.lnk.to/fitptmID Follow Portugal. The Man Website: http://www.portugaltheman.com/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/portugaltheman IG: https://www.instagram.com/portugaltheman/ TW: https://twitter.com/portugaltheman?lang=en SC: https://soundcloud.com/portugaltheman YT: https://www.youtube.com/user/Portugalthemanband Tumblr: http://portugaltheman.tumblr.com W+K PORTLAND Executive Creative Directors Eric Baldwin, Susan Hoffman, Jason Bagley Creative Director Jason Kreher Copywriter Mike Egan Art Director Tim Semple Integrated Production Director Mike Davidson Producer Blake Carrillo Project Lead Annie Barker Studio Designers Caitlin Alexander, Curtis Pachunka, Garrett Close Comms Planning Kelsey Bozanich Business Affairs Amber Lavender, Anna Beth Nagel PR Brandon Reynolds PRODUCTION COMPANY: PRETTYBIRD Director Ian Schwartz Executive Producer Derek Richmond Director fourclops ;;) Executive Producer Candice Dragonas DP Michael Ragen Line Producer Judy Craig 1st AC Eric Macey Production Coordinator Richard Theisen 2nd AC Peggy Knobel AD Javier Vargas DIT Guy Wagner 2nd AD Dylan Morris Steadicam Sam Naiman Location Scout/Mgr Tucker Wysong Production Designer Jonny Fenix Truck PA Josh Pino Art Director Dave Koenig Pass Van PA Ben Arnold Set Dresser Nate Smith Set PA Chris Barga Art Shopper Emily Weck Set PA Michael Diallo Stylist Elena Crowson Set PA Keaton Suskie Wardrobe/Stylist Asst. Rebecca Therkelsen Set PA Jared Wong Hair/Makeup Jessica Needham Key Grip Fro Waters Gaffer Jake Lyon Best Boy Grip Keegan Larson Electric Michael Weiss Grip Clay Caldwell Best Boy Electric Justin Ward Medic Lucas Buckhardt Swing Cory Standridge TALENT Dancers Jungwho Kim, Daisy Lim, Westin Kmetz Activist Chidozie Urom Whig Senators Craig Kennedy, Angus Viera Rapper The Last Artful, Dodgr Couple Hailey Henry, Levi Appelton POST Editor Ernie Gilbert Graphics/FX Eugene McMahon On-Set Editor Nic Adenau Telecine Greg Reeves at The Mill Telecine Producer Thatcher Peterson, Diana Valera INTERACTIVE Video Technology WIREWAX Head of Development Jose Rego Lead Developer Jennifer Mah Javascript Developer John Flockton Head of Creative Steve Paxson SPECIAL THANKS Soul Trigger Dance Crew David Schwartz Boone Howard Ethan Merritt Slim Boogie Wildcat Junkyard Wes Hubbard Ian Shaw Sarah McMurrary Eddye Borgese Jagi Katial Scott Shevack Heather Elliot Brock Fetch Naomi Keim Rami Hachache


3. OFFF Barcelona 2011 Main Titles

Still shocked and excited from last night, it's an honor for us to show you this absolutely MINDBLOWING TITLES made for OFFF by PostPanic. Thank you so much to PostPanic, and specially to Mischa Rozema, Ania Markham and Si Scott, simply epic!!! Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people. Says Ania Markham, Executive Producer at PostPanic: “The images created by the crew of people working on the titles has been unbelievable, with nationalities represented including Dutch, Czech, English, American, Polish, German, Swedish and Belgian. It’s been a great opportunity for all of us to work together on a non-commercial project we’re passionate about and we’re so proud of the combined effort and final result.” DIRECTORS NOTES (Mischa Rozema) This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place. This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations. So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero. There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie. Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival. To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare. We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; ) How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot. When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us). In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer. The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles. The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project. Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this. CREDITS 
 Directed by Mischa Rozema Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott Production Company: PostPanic Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema Music & Sound Design: Hecq Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker Production Designer: Roland Mylanus Editor: Mischa Rozema Prague Cast: Main Hero: Vladan Bláha Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova Post-Production: PostPanic CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves 3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek 2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel 3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx 2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor Graphic Designs: Si Scott Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction Production (Prague) by Savage: Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari Producer: Michaela Berkova Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka Prop master: Jan Fiala Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs Location: CREVISTON, a.s. Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague


4. It Gets Better

  • Published: 2012-04-06T03:49:29+00:00
  • Duration: 124
  • By It Gets Better

a Visual Essay by Eli Guerron... (play it full screen and with sound) First off, I would like to thank you for watching this short film, entitled "It Gets Better." This film is a visual poem, one that focuses on the hard times every single one of us has gone through in the process of discovering who we want to be, dry patches in the journey of finding out who it is we really are... Isolation. Desolation. Courage. Endurance. And in the final moment, grasp of self-realization, represented in simple elements of visual design. I have been working on this short for months, and one of the nicest moments I've experienced was on 10/12/10, when I listened to Joel Burns give a speech encouraging those who suffer dire situations to remember one thing- "it gets better". Listening to Joel, I realize that this film might not change the situation. It might not end suffering or change the mentality of the perpetrators, but what it CAN do is help the perpetrated to become stronger, arming them with a positive attitude and a resonant hope for the future. I would like to thank Joel Burns for his inspiration, and to all our silent collaborators. Please feel free to contact me at itgetsbetterfilm@gmail.com if you're interested in screenings, or if you would like to get a higher version of this file for your own postings or sharing on your websites. Remember to thank those who are still fighting, still strong, still walking that beautiful journey and discovering themselves... As I leave, all I can say is, "It gets better"... In the memory of those who are no longer at our sides, fighting for us... in our hearts. "...it gets better..." per request... for those interested... a technical breakdown and more info on the making process of this essay at www.osito.tv


5. Year Zero - OFFF Barcelona 2011 Main Titles

  • Published: 2011-06-09T10:23:12+00:00
  • Duration: 382
  • By PostPanic

Following in the footsteps of Prologue Films and The Mill, PostPanic have created this year’s prestigious opening titles 'Year Zero' for OFFF Festival 2011 in Barcelona http://offf.ws/bcn2011/ Written by Mischa Rozema and British graphic designer, Si Scott, the opening titles reflect their dark thoughts on a possible future. Directed by Mischa and shot on location in Prague, the film guides the viewer through a grim scenario embedded with the names of artists appearing at this year’s OFFF festival. The live action was brought back to Amsterdam for post, primarily carried out by PostPanic’s in-house team of artists but also with the additional help of freelancers and partner companies that we have enjoyed strong creative relationships with over the years. It’s really fair to say that this was a labour of love by a passionate crew of people. DIRECTOR'S NOTES (By Mischa Rozema) This project started out as a collaboration between myself and Si Scott. Right from the start, we decided that it should be the darkest thing we could make. I think it just felt natural to the both of us; if we had to nail the future, it would not be a nice place. This idea evolved into a clash of times. Inspired by an idea from the late Arthur C. Clarke. He wrote about different historical civilizations meeting in a single point in time. So what happens when civilizations meet? The 'weaker' one gets eaten by the 'stronger'. You only have to look at history to see the destructive power of civilizations. So the main underlying idea is: what would happen if the future lands on our doorstep today? Let's take mankind, add perhaps 100 years and then let them show up on our doorstep today. The future would pretty much devour the present. Probably in a matter of, let's say, 7 days… So that's what we're looking at. But every ending also means a new beginning, hence Year Zero. There's all kinds of hidden messages in there. Like the virus eating away at reality, buildings and people, even at the viewers brain. It's behaving off course much like a computer virus. And the network of wires represents the future of social networking. I just made it physical and let it 'catch' the city and it's people like a net. All these ideas just serve as inspiration for us to create a future that worked for this concept. They're not meant to be deciphered by the audience. It's still meant to be just a title sequence and not an actual movie. Now what makes a good title sequence? Personally, I think it's something that gets you in the mood, warms you up for what you're about to experience, be it a film, tv series or in our case, the OFFF festival. We decided to treat the OFFF festival as a feature film experience. So all we had to do was get the viewer into the right state of mind. Without, of course, being too narrative led. The best title sequences out there are nothing but a random collection of images/scenes that don't tell a lot if you watch them on their own. But edit them together and a new context is created. A context that matters, a feeling that gets the viewer ready for the main event, in our case, the festival. To get started, the next thing we did was make a collection of ideas that would scare me and Si. So, anything drawn from our youth, right through to stuff that's inspired us over the years as well as seemingly random compositions that trigger the imagination of the viewer. For example, when we show you the aesthetics of a car explosion, it's carefully constructed. Why a car and not something else? Because an exploding car brings extra content to an otherwise simple aesthetic display of violence. A car doesn't explode by itself so instantly the brain tries to formulate the background behind it. It adds an either political or criminal edge to the violence. To me it felt appropriate because of the sense of protest and rebellion the shot has. And maybe the biggest question; was there someone in the car and if so, who was it? For me, every idea should provoke these kind of questions; from a girl in a prom dress holding a rocket launcher to a riot cop standing in the kitchen. All scenes have a pre and post story to them. In no time you're actually trying to connect these seemingly random scenes and boom; you've just created your own strange context. You now have a feeling, a taste and lots of questions probably. Questions that normally would be answered by watching the actual movie. But since there's no actual movie here we'll leave stranded with, hopefully, an uncomfortable feeling and lots of questions - some might feel unsatisfied and wondering why. Just like a nightmare. We also wanted the actual titles to be different this time. Most of the time festival titles are driven by the idea on how to show titles. A mechanism that displays titles in a creative way. We actually thought to bring the festival theme to the foreground and have the titles play a part in it. Incorporate them so they become the actual fiber/texture of the piece itself. Practically I still think it's nice that the viewer has to actively look for the names and not get too comfortable. Even if it means to see it a couple of times which surely is the best we can aim for as a free project ; ) How about the shoot? Well, prior to Prague we created more than 50 ideas I could play with. This was always the intention. Go out shooting with a tiny crew, acting like we're still in art school and be open for anything that might happen. That's why we shot everything on 2 Canon 5D's (that and having no budget off course). This was a really nice change for me. Normally I prepare commercial shoots to the very last detail and there's a lot more people involved. Savage helped us out big time in Prague. We also had some bad news. Due to his back problems Si Scott had to abandon the project and couldn't join the shoot. When we came back from Prague I started editing straight away and soon came to the conclusion we had about 60 vfx shots to work on and no budget and increasingly less time. Remember that this project was a side dish for PostPanic, we had to work on commissioned jobs also. But everybody involved soon fell in love with the project, including STORM Postproduction who are our neighbors (luckily for us). In the mean time we received the title list. It had about 70 names on it! That's when I found out that the dynamics I wanted to use would probably not work. Just too many names that would make the piece too long to just show random images. So in the plane towards Prague I thought of bringing in a tiny bit of narrative. Which turned out to be the beginning of the sequence (1st act). I wrote in a lead character that would relate to the viewer. The idea was to trick the audience into thinking they're watching some kind of documentary. We basically follow a guy going home. Bit by bit his environment gets stranger and more uncomfortable to watch. Is he living in a war zone? Slowly the background takes over and the piece changes into an urban nightmare. And like a nightmare, the story/edit doesn't always make sense but makes you feel really uncomfortable. I also wanted the viewer to experience the nightmare. That's where the dark matter comes in. Dark matter is what I call the macro shot bits. Flashes that derail your train of thought like there's something eating away at your brain as you try to make sense of the nightmare. I wanted the viewer to go nuts, alongside with the cast. Erase the line between nightmare and reality. The end result is something you won't come across easily on your tv. And is also just another fun way to do titles. The sound design and music made by Hecq added a lot to the feel and scale of the film. It clearly divides the 3 acts (1st act: up to execution, 2nd from execution, 3rd final shot) and makes completely different ideas and scenes feel coherent. It also emphasizes the dynamics of the film and brings the much needed pace at the end. It's been great working with Ben. We've been surfing the same wave length throughout the project. Finally I want to thank everyone involved for making these titles possible. For creating something out of nothing. For showing so much love for something as dark as this. CREDITS 
 Directed by Mischa Rozema Story by Mischa Rozema & Si Scott Production Company: PostPanic Executive Producers: Jules Tervoort, Ania Markham DoP: Jiri Malek, Mischa Rozema Music & Sound Design: Hecq Senior Producer: Annejes van Liempd Production Assistant: Jacinta Ramaker Production Designer: Roland Mylanus, Nicole Nieuwenhuis Editor: Mischa Rozema Prague Cast: Main Hero: Vladan Bláha Grafitti Guy: Tom Malar Main Hero Sister: Katerina Galova Post-Production: PostPanic CG Supervisor: Ivor Goldberg VFX Supervisor: Chris Staves 3D Artists: Jeroen Aerts, Matthijs Joor, Jurriën Boogert, Marnix Reckman, Adam Janeczek 2D Artist: Erwin van den IJssel 3D Interns: Cara To, Xander Clerckx 2D Interns: Mathijs Luijten, Per Westholm Compositing: Chris Staves, Ivor Goldberg, Adam Janeczek, Matthijs Joor Graphic Designs: Si Scott Additional Graffiti Elements: Florian Stumpe Matte Painting: Wieger Poutsma Additional 3D and Compositing: Storm PostProduction Production (Prague) by Savage: Executive Producer: Klara Kralickova, Pavla Burgetova Callegari Producer: Michaela Berkova Production Assistant: Vojta Ruzicka Prop master: Jan Fiala Location Scout & Management: Petr Bastar, Adam Fuchs Location: CREVISTON, a.s. Tattoos made by: Wowa tattoo prague About OFFF Festival 2011 OFFF is an entity in continuous transformation, alive and evolutionary. More than a decade ago, it was born as a post-digital culture festival; a meeting place to host contemporary creation through an in depth program of conferences, workshops and performances by the most relevant artists of our time. These days, OFFF keeps being a reference event throughout the world. A festival hosted in Barcelona, New York, Lisbon and Paris which has featured renowned artists such as Joshua Davis, Stefan Sagmeister, John Maeda, Neville Brody, Kyle Cooper, The Mill, Digital Kitchen, Ben Fry & Casey Reas, Golan Levin, Chris Milk, Rob Chiu, Julien Vallée, Paula Scher, Rick Poynor, Erik Spiekermann, Dvein, Erik Natzke, Vincent Moon, Ze Frank, Alex Trochut, among others…The festival where a new generation of artists has originated and developed. All of them started attending OFFF as spectators. Today, they take up its main stage.


6. IMPACT

Impact tells the story of the mental journey of a high diver in the seconds before his jump. Impact is a world first in several respects: The vertical format – 4K – 1000fps slow-motion – the environment (underwater and cliffs). Impact is a team imaging adventure, directed by Jean-Charles Granjon and shot in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region of southeast France. This is thus a condensed reflection of the cinematic expertise of Marseille, southeast France. Lionel Franc, world champion cliff diver head first is the "hero" of Impact. Impact is also a reflection about the way we use our natural environment. The wonderfull natural sites where we shot this short film is just 7km away from a site wich still undergo a massive pollution by an Alluminium Industry from The City of Gardane, south of France. This has been lasting for 50 years. More than 20 millions tons of toxic wastes are now lying under the surface of mediterranea. A national Parc was created on this pollution site and you know what? Aluminium industry still have permission to pollut! If you feel concerne about the protection of your natural film settings, please sign this petition : http://collectifslittoral.fr/index.php/fr/petition-contre-les-boues-rouges Line producer: Bluearth production - Vertical film Post Production : La planète rouge If you like it, please fellow and share these facebbok pages: https://www.facebook.com/impact134k


7. Brett Rheeder - This Is Home

  • Published: 2015-12-09T23:39:49+00:00
  • Duration: 285
  • By Ride Shimano

"My home has always been in Ontario. I wanted to tell the story of where I live and where I come from, my whole family lives within 50km of each other in southern Ontario. My cousins let me use their farm land to build the course. We hoped the dirt was going to be good, but as soon as we dug into the ground we knew it was gold and the best part is it’s only 4kms from my house. I know that Ontario is not ideal for mountain biking, but with a little work I feel it can be, and that’s what I wanted to show. For me, This is Home." - Brett Rheeder Featuring: Brett Rheeder Filmed By: Harrison Mendel and Liam Mullany Edited By: Harrison Mendel Written By: Josh Palmer and Liam Mullany Drone Pilot: Maguire Brice Sound Design: Racket Sound Title Design: Studio Dialog Still Photography: Robb Thompson Additional Riders: Brayden Barrett-hay Special Thanks: Phils Haulage, Mike Rice, Ryan Korpikoski, Chad Mainprize, Greg Corcoran, Krystyna Corcoran, Kyle Corcoran "Juparo" Broke for Free www.brokeforfree.com “The Path Before Me” Performed by Buffalo KIllers Courtesy of Alive Naturalsound by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group "Golden Hour" Broke for Free www.brokeforfree.com


8. I'm a stuntman - Eos Karlsson

  • Published: 2012-04-07T23:47:40+00:00
  • Duration: 152
  • By Eos Karlsson

I rarely sit still, so don't forget to connect with me if you want to keep up. www.eoskarlsson.com www.facebook.com/eoskarlsson www.youtube.com/eoskarlsson www.twitter.com/eoskarlsson /Enjoy! Hey, my name is Eos Karlsson. I am a professional actor, stuntman and dance-acrobat. This is my Stunt Reel, showcasing some of my stunt work that i have performed in feature films, video games (motion capture), short films, commercials, training concepts, music videos, stage productions, events, live action shows, and galas. I'm always looking for new, exciting collaborations with productions and other artists. If you are interested in working with me or just want to say hi, feel free to contact me at: mail@eoskarlsson.com ______________________________________________________________________ www.instagram.com/eoskarlsson I spend the other half of my time working as a filmmaker and graphic designer. For me, it's the perfect balance.


9. Feel it Still

  • Published: 2017-08-05T00:17:43+00:00
  • Duration: 144
  • By Michael Fahey

A music video created in 2 day's at the Filmed workshop. Special thanks to Claire Imler and Daniel Crane for being awesome mentors. Song: Feel it Still by Portugal the Man


10. Closer by NIN - Covered by Kawehi

  • Published: 2013-07-02T20:36:15+00:00
  • Duration: 359
  • By Kawehi

DISCLAIMER: If the word FUCK offends you then I suggest you don't watch this video, yo. I remember the first time I heard this song. I was fresh out of high school, driving with the windows down to my job at Jamba Juice from Waikiki beach. I could feel the sun on my skin from laying out - and I still smelt of salt water. I'm sure I was running late to work (sorry, Malia!). And then this song comes on the radio. I remember pulling over on the side of the street - I've never heard anything like it up to this point. And my initial response was bigger than "I like this song" or "I don't like this song." It was a feeling that took over, a sense of wonder and unfamiliarity. Paul and I really wanted to change things up - because change is always a good thing. Dare to do something that you'd never think of doing. After receiving Ableton, I thought the best way to learn how the hell to use it was by doing a video. It helped - I love how Ableton gives you endless possibilities to create music. I hope you enjoy this video as much as I enjoyed making it! As always, say WASABI: http://facebook.com/iamkawehi booyah. k.


11. BatmanFX Breakdowns

  • Published: 2013-09-04T00:59:22+00:00
  • Duration: 144
  • By Matt Radford

This project was intense. A month and a half to do R&D and all the shots. 28 by the end. You know.. I still feel there is no real good solution to snow in VFX. That crate shot at the end.. I hate it.. I did a little interview with Cebas about this: http://www.cebas.com/?pid=testimonial&tid=90


12. 10328x7760 - A 10K Timelapse Demo

"10328x7760 - A 10K Timelapse Demo" is a video I put together showcasing the extreme resolution of the PhaseOne IQ180 camera of which it was shot. This footage comes from some shots I did while shooting 4K and 8K timelapses in Rio De Janeiro for a major electronics manufacturer. Each shot is comprised of hundreds individual still images, each weighing in at a whopping 80 megapixels. Each individual raw frame measures 10328x7760 pixels. Each shot was very minimally processed and included curves, input sharpening, saturation adjustments. The h264 compression really kills alot of the fine detail. No noise reduction was done on any of the shots. I tried to keep the shots as close to raw as possible so you may see some dust spots, noise, and manual exposure changes I made while shooting. For a final video edit these adjustments would be smoothed out and fixed. Normally I run shots where I manually change exposure during the shot through LRTimelapse, but unfortunately the program can't seem to handle such huge raw files. I also had to loop some shots in order to have enough runtime to do some zooms, so you may see a jump in the footage here and there. Each shot sequence starts off with the full resolution footage scaled down to fit within a 1920x1080 resolution (14% scale). The next shot in each shot sequence is the full resolution shot scaled to 50%, so basically zooming in quite a bit. From there we go into the full resolution shot scaled to 100%, which is an extreme zoom/crop. As you can see, the quality and detail holds up extremely well, it’s pretty amazing. I wanted to show a couple things with this demo video. First, the extreme resolution of this camera (and medium format in general). Second, the amazing amount of flexibility this resolution allows for in post production. You can literally get about 8-10 solid 1920x1080 shots out of a single shot. You can also get about 5-6 solid 4K shots out of a single shot. If you enjoyed this demo videos please feel free to pass it around and share it. If you enjoy my work, or want to see some of my other work (including the full Rio video) you find me on all the social media outlets below. BEST VIEWED FULLSCREEN IN FULL HD Music: Licensed from themusicbed.com Artist: Tony Anderson Song: Hold On http://www.tonyandersonmusic.com/ All footage is Copyright Joe Capra - Scientifantastic 2015, and may not be used without permission. Special thanks to my local Rio producer/assistant/badass Jose Olimpio ( http://www.joseolimpio.com ) WWW.SCIENTIFANTASTIC.COM YOU CAN FOLLOW ME AT: Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/scientifantasti Instagram - http://instagram.com/scientifantastic Vimeo - http://www.vimeo.com/scientifantastic Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Scientifantastic/163137190447579 Google+ - http://gplus.to/scientifantastic 500px - http://500px.com/scientifantastic ProPic - http://propic.com/scientifantastic


13. The Harmony of Fall

Autumn is that romantic, melancholy and harmonious season that all photographers rush to capture from its arrival. And no wonder, the light, the colours and the energy displayed by the autumn, are ideal fuel for encouraging the creativity of any visual artist. I traveled to Croatia and Slovenia in order to capture this amazing spectacle of nature, and now I feel like I made the right choice. Time-lapse: Enrique Pacheco (www.enriquepacheco.com) Original Score: Peter Nanasi (www.peternanasi.com) Shot in 6K & 7K Raw still pictures. Motorized Slider by mSlider: www.mslider.com To know more about this work visit my blog: http://www.enriquepacheco.com/looking-for-the-harmony-of-fall/ ------------------------------------ www.enriquepacheco.com
 twitter.com/EnriquePacheco_ 
facebook.com/eppacheco 
instagram.com/enrique_pacheco_photo - - If you want to license this footage, it’s available in super sharp 4k at my store: http://www.enriquepacheco.com/stock/?lang=es // or you can contact the media department: media@enriquepacheco.com
 (please only professional enquires, high quality footage is not for free)


14. Star Trek: Legacy

A 22 minute Recut of 'Star Trek-The Motion Picture' set to Daft Punk's modern original score for 'Tron: Legacy'. I always thought the two film's scores were very reminiscent of one another and I wanted to use that to give this recut a more updated feel while still maintaining some aspect of the pacing and staging of the original (very long) film and it's big special effect scenes. @ICouldDoA https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWDEJWAxf3QC4vkMSnZvSuQ


15. TV3 Puls - Ident4

  • Published: 2014-01-07T12:00:31+00:00
  • Duration: 14
  • By Frame.

TV3 commissioned Frame to create a new brand identity based around a set of idents for their female biased lifestyle channel TV3 Puls. The package aligns with a update range of content on the channel. The idents sit comfortably as part of the TV3 family. TV3 was very focused on the idea of creating an identity package that reflected the feel of the channel rather than the content of it. They had to be abstract, clearly avoiding literal clichees and had to be all graphic. Obviously it was very important for the channel to fit into the TV3 family while still holding its own. In order to reflect the mood of the channel we were drawn towards natural materials and textures to create something that you would love to touch and feel. At the same time we did not want to be literal so we invented fictive objects and shapes that resembled abstract interior/design objects but that clearly did not have a real-world purpose. These semi-natural objects were deliberately mixed with all-synthetic CG objects which were then arranged into still-life-esque compositions. We decided to base each ident around abstract concepts such as, a breath of fresh air, opening up, socializing, attraction, and balance. All positive concepts that could serve as the driving idea behind each ident. We wanted to create a unique look that was cutting edge and aspirational with (wo)Man at the center of the idea.


16. Playgrounds Opening Titles 2009

Working together with Onesize we created the Playgrounds festival opening titles. Basically it are two guys beating the shit out of each other. It was very important to give the movie a high end feeling. While there was a small budget it looks like it was created with a big budget. It has the look and feel of a movie filmed with an expensive high-speed camera. But actually the complete movie is build up out of photographs only. Quoted from Onesize (with whom I created this piece with): The film was created in little over 2 weeks. Playgrounds director Leon van Rooij asked us, like 6 months ago, if we wanted to do the titles for this years' fest. I quote: "Playgrounds is a two-day festival in Tilburg, the Netherlands, where you can see the best digital audiovisual art in the world, such as musicvideos, animations, commercials, character design, VFX and games AND you can find out how it's been made during artist lectures and Q&A's." Of course we said yes, because doing titles for festivals like these are rare opportunities. So we welcomed it with open arms. Next to that, we've been involved in the festival for 3 years now and we are the first ones to design a title sequence for this festival. What a burden... ;) With no creative brief and even less budget, we slowly started thinking, concepting, designing, thinking of how we could create something impressive, something new, something with a lot of production value but produce-able within 3 weeks and of course something we had not done before with our team, to challenge ourselves even more. We ended up with the idea to have 2 fighters fighting over whatever on a children's playground. Kind of a metaphor for a creative process, which can be a battle sometimes.. kill your darlings.. etc.. etc... Anyway, this could become visually very interesting, so we thought. We focused on the image, look and feel, a bit more than we used to this time, simply because we wanted to. We did some research, especially on the visual style in photography, the air we wanted the film to breath. Initially, the film needed to be very slow paced, almost like a dance on classical music in ultra slow motion, this was still the idea at the time when we shot the images. Just ultra slow motion, shooting with a phantom camera would not do the trick for us. We wanted to have more control over the slow motion in post production, still be be able to decide camera angles and motion. To do this we used the camera mapping technique in 3D. The production was made fairly simple compared to live-action shoots with high speed camera's shooting on location. By using this technique, simply because we only needed still images, we wrapped the shoot in 3 hours. Our photographer, Jasper Faber did an outstanding job by using only 2 flash lights, a camera and a macbook. In post production we changed the direction a little, we wanted more action. Jasper took a bunch of photo's which I found out could work just fine in a quick sequence. The contrast between the ultra slow-motion image and super fast paced short sequences made it more powerful and dramatized the impact of the slow motion sequence. Joris, our sound designer did what was necessary to enhance the impact even more. For the production of this shoot we contacted rotterdam based production company Revolver and asked them if they wanted to help us out producing the shoot. Luckily they said yes They just contracted photographer Jasper Faber who was willing to shoot the images and help us out with the production, since we knew that post production would be very time consuming. Revolver helped us out producing it, so we could focus on direction and post production. The people who saw it thus far, all responded to the film equally, asking the same question "... how did you shoot it, with a phantom?" .. no, it's all 3D. Credits: Direction & Post-Production - Onesize (http://www.onesize.com) Sound Design - Studio Takt (http://www.studio-takt.com) Production Company - Revolver (http://www.revolver.nl/) Producer - Dijana Olcay-Hot Photography - Jasper Faber (http://www.jasperfaber.com/photography.html) Fighter #1 - Jeroen Roos Fighter #2 - Cesario di Domenico Make-up - Elseline Hokke (http://www.elselinehokke.nl/) Location Scout - Hans v/d Berg Playgroundfestival: (http://www.playgroundsfestival.nl/)


17. Nike Evo

  • Published: 2013-07-23T00:46:50+00:00
  • Duration: 26
  • By We Are Royale

What if you had a shoe so lightweight it felt like you had nothing on at all? Nike Flyknit technology was inspired by feedback from runners craving a shoe with the snug (and virtually unnoticed) fit of a sock. The Nike Free Hyperfeel Running Shoe gets you closer to the ground for a revolutionary feel that allows your foot to move freely, while still providing a plush, resilient ride mile after mile. Jay prefers weights to running, but loves rocking these shoes on his morning strolls with Oscar.


18. Gone Too Soon: The Complexity of Time

  • Published: 2013-09-30T04:57:31+00:00
  • Duration: 25
  • By ByTheSea

Time is fleeting, yet it stands still. Some events happen so swiftly there's no time to process anything. Yet sometimes a minute can feel like an age, or a decade can feel like just yesterday. You think that you have so much of it until somebody you truly love runs out of it. Created for the Weekend Challenge: vimeo.com/groups/weekendchallenge.


19. Cinema 4D Tutorial 29 - 'Low poly' theory

  • Published: 2012-11-17T10:35:12+00:00
  • Duration: 1163
  • By Sam Welker

In this video I talk about creating the popular low poly look in Cinema 4D. My approach this time was to do a time-lapse of an actual creation then to add a voice over on top. I hope this works for all of you. If you have any questions feel free to drop them below or hit me up on twitter @samwelkertv. Disclaimer: I did get my wisdom teeth out earlier in the week and I am still a little out of it as a result. If you can't handle that, I apologize. Looking for inspiration? I've put together some links on my blog post pointing you to some good artists around the web: http://wp.me/p1PALB-7L


20. our first Share project. Old Skool Cafe

  • Published: 2012-05-14T06:07:57+00:00
  • Duration: 356
  • By stillmotion

this year we launched Share, a stillmotion effort to give back. every year we'll donate our time and gear to tell a one story that could use our help to get a wider audience or recognition. if you'd like to nominate somebody for our next share film, please email us at share@stillmotion.ca getting to know so many of the people that make up Old Skool showed us a world that few of us had ever experienced first hand. it was certainly my first time visiting the projects and you can immediately feel the environment as you enter. as you'll see in the film, what we were left with was such a warm portrait of these youth who put so much of who they are, and so much heart into making Old Skool a success. i can remember being in that age range, not quite 20 yet, and i don't think i could point to one thing that i care about half as much as these youth care about Old Skool. their perspective and determination at such a young age is absolutely awe-inspiring. last Friday we brought a projector down to Old Skool to premier this piece. among a packed restaurant, Teresa stopped the kitchen and had everybody come out and take a moment to share in the experience. Tammy's first reaction to the film, through tears, was especially touching. she said that the Old Skool family means so much to her and the film showed the world how she knows each of them to be in her heart. /////////////////// soundtrack selection for the soundtrack we needed music that was at first quiet and contemplative, and later uplifting. originally we thought something with piano would work great for the first chapter, but it didn't feel perfect for the tone of the piece - while it filled the quiet need,we still felt the contemplative aspect was missing. we've always been a fan of Drew Barefoot's music because of the contemplative nature of the music - you can't help but reflect on your own life as you listen to it. Enjoy The Calm filled both needs perfectly - it's both quiet and contemplative. when you watch this film, you feel a sense of calm in the characters as they talk about their past experiences; they've come to terms with who they were, and now they're looking at who they are and who they are going to be, and the title of the track and the music therein couldn't have been more perfect. for the uplifting chapter, we turned to Kelli Schaefer's - Song For a Friend. the music, while uplifting, isn't over the top - it felt perfect for the emotional tone of the second chapter of the film and the lyrics couldn't have been better suited to the piece - I'm just going to stand by your side, I'm just going to hold your hand tight - it's exactly what Old Skool is about and it couldn't have been any more perfect for the end of the their film. Music licensed at www.WithEtiquette.com Drew Barefoot - Enjoy the Calm Kelli Schaefer - Song For A Friend /////////////////// more on Share Share started because we wanted to give back. after our first film, we feel like we have taken much more than we gave, and for that we have to thank everybody at Old Skool. if you enjoy the film and want to support Old Skool, please share their film and come visit their restaurant. if you have ideas or want to help our with our next Share film, please email is at share@stillmotion.ca For licensing inquiries, please contact discovery@storyandheart.com


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